_____________ MOBILITY: DEATH AND INJURY _____________ 2018 New Mobility Master Class Session 3. (Draft for comment)

Cite source of graphic

Paris, 20 Feb. 2018.

This draft posting is intended for informal peer review and critique in the context of a new international collaborative program of New Mobility Master Classes being planned for 2018-2020. The core text that follows is taken verbatim from Chapter 3 of John Whiteleggs well-received 2015 book Mobility A New Urban Design and Transport Planning Philosophy for a Sustainable Future. The remainder of the text for this session is still in process. It will shortly be completed with an introduction to the 2018 Master Class program by the editor who is serving as course leader, along with a short list of recommended reading (3-5 online references) and a closing discussion and commentary by participants and visiting colleagues)

Contents (working draft)

  1. General introduction (2 parts)
  2. MOBILITY: Chapter 3. Death and Injury
  3. Conclusions
  4. Selected references
  5. About the authors
  6. How to obtain the book
  7. Translation
  8. Facebook
  9. Reader comments
  10. Last words
  11. Continue reading
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_____________ MOBILITY: DEATH AND INJURY _____________ For 2018 New Mobility Master Class #3. (Draft for comment)

FB MC Whitelegg sWEDEN master classes

Paris, 15 Feb. 2018.

This draft posting is intended for informal peer review and private commentary in the context of a new international collaborative program of New Mobility Master Classes being planned for 2018-2020. The core text you find here is taken verbatim from Chapter 3 of John Whiteleggs well-received 2015 book Mobility A New Urban Design and Transport Planning Philosophy for a Sustainable Future. The remainder of the text for this session is still in process and presented for now as a draft intended for review, comment and suggestions. It will shortly be completed with an introduction to the 2018 Master Class program by the editor who is serving as course leader, along with a short list of recommended reading (3-5 online references) and a closing discussion and commentary by participants and visiting colleagues)

Contents

  1. General introduction (2 parts)
  2. Mobility: Chapter 3. Death and Injury
  3. Conclusions and last words
  4. Selected references
  5. About the authors
  6. How to obtain
  7. Translation
  8. Facebook page
  9. Reader comments

 

 

 

1.  General Introduction

  • Text to follow 

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2.  Mobility Chapter 3. Death and Injury

One of the most obvious, pervasive and unacceptable consequences of motorised mobility is death and injury in the road traffic environment. It is over 60 years since John Dean addressed the problem in his book “Murder most foul” (Dean, 1947):

“It is common ground that the motor slaughter ought to be stopped; it is also common ground that it can be stopped, or at least greatly reduced.. it is realised that the killing or maiming every year of about a quarter of a million persons ..are not items that any country can afford to ignore .. i t is also realised, if less clearly, that the motor slaughter leaves behind it an ever widening trail of private misery-bereavement, poverty resulting from the death of the breadwinner, crippledom and the rest and that this, too, ought to be stopped.

Finally, it is realised, if again it is less clearly, that the motor slaughter is bad in itself: that it is bad that human beings should kill and maim other human beings.in this cold blooded way: worst of all that as happens in a very large proportion of the cases, vigorous adults should kill or maim children and elderly and infirm persons and then criminally and meanly put the blame on their victims: that in short, it is not only the lives and well-being of about a quarter of a million persons and the material loss every year that are at stake, but to a high degree, the standards of decency and the moral health of the nation.

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The Cause of Global Inequality: Comparing Jared Diamond and Henry George

 

 

Can inequality within and between societies be explained in terms of merit and intelligence, or are the most important determinants of inequality beyond individual control? Both economist Henry George and geographer Jared Diamond essentially asked this same question, examining the fundamental forces that have shaped human history. They come to startlingly similar conclusions. These similarities have not, until now, been connected and compared so directly.

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Efficiency, equity, education, democracy, environment, accomplishment, modesty and fresh ideas . . . You’d be singing too

Part I: A Flashmob in Helsinki

A flashmob choral intrusion that took place on one more winter day in the main train station of Helsinki, the capital of Finland. But what are they singling about?

(A flash mob (just to recall and in case you were out shopping at the time) is an unannounced event involving, by all appearance,s an unrelated group of people who suddenly emerge from the shadows and assemble in a public place, perform an unusual and unexplained act for a brief time, then quickly disperse and continue on their ways.  As you can just see here.)

Part II. A Finnish story: Introduction

A bit of context in case you your Finnish history needs a reminder. Here you have a brief  introductory text (quickly translate, apologies) to an excellent  one hour documentary that has just appeared on Arte, the French/German public television. (Sadly not yet available in English, so you can test your French, German, Finnish and the striking images which tell a story of their own.)

A century ago, December 6, 1917, Finland proclaimed its independence. Blending archives and testimonies, this enlightening documentary retraces the great events that have marked the history of this young European nation. Attached from the thirteenth century to the Kingdom of Sweden, then swallowed in the early nineteenth by Tsar Alexander I, Finland, the fifth largest territory of the European Union, manages to find its own way after the October Revolution, negotiating their sovereignty with Lenin.

Traumatized since  independence by a deadly civil war, then ravaged during the Second World War by the fighting between the armies of Stalin and those of Hitler,  Finland paid a terrible price during its first half-century of existence.

After WW2 Finland, finding its place in the concert of nations, was the host of the Olympic Games in 1952 before hosting, in 1975, the representatives of the thirty-five signatory states of the Helsinki Accords, which still govern their peaceful cooperation. Begun after the war, the development of his industry has brought the country , with its telecom champion Nokia, in the big leagues of globalization.

Subordination and tragedies

It was in the 16th century, with the first translation of the Bible into Finnish, that the foundation stone of the Finnish “national novel” was laid. Going back in time, Olivier Horn, the film’s director, recounts the centuries of foreign domination and tragedies that Finland traversed before and after their common conquest of independence. Historians, journalists, politicians – including former President of the Republic Tarja Halonen (2000-2012) , novelists (Roman Schatz, Kjell Westö, Sirpa Kähkönen), but also ordinary citizens shed light on the most important events in history of the still  young nation.

Drawing heavily on the archives, the documentary also recalls Finland’s persistent progressive aspirations. The first in Europe to establish women’s right to vote and to be elected to public office in 1906, Finland (5.5 million inhabitants) continues to make youth education the keystone of its success. Relieved by the end of the Cold War, then by the collapse of the USSR of which it was a privileged trading partner, Finland is continuing to make its own way.

 

Part III: You’d be singing too.

Finland university graduate ceremony hats

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About the editor

Eric Britton
9, rue Gabillot, 69003 Lyon France

Bio: Educated as a development economist, Eric Britton is an American political scientist, teacher and international sustainability activist who has lived and worked in Paris since 1969. Professor of Sustainable Development, Economy and Democracy at the Institut Supérieur de Gestion (Paris), he is also MD of EcoPlan Association, an independent advisory network providing strategic counsel for government and business on policy and decision issues involving complex systems, social-technical change and sustainable development. Founding editor of World Streets: The Politics of Transport - https://worldstreets.wordpress.com . | Britton online: https://goo.gl/9CJXTh

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Before “Circular Economy”: Historical Antecedents

CE Antecedents heros x2

More often than not the concept or application of  what is called”Circular Economy” is treated as an entirely new toolbox or approach, that is to say somehow historyless, This is or course far from the case.

The goal of the above  quickly fashioned mosaic is to serve as a reminder — and incomplete reminder — of some of the great men and great thinking that came before, with this listing taking us up to the beginning of this still new century,.  (Surly I have missed here some  of the important figures, who to my mind constitute the Ffounding Fathers of Circular Economy. So please fo not be shy and share your thoguhts on this with us.)

And just in case it did not strike you, they are, to a man, just that: all males. I  don’t quite know what to make of this, but it is at the very  least worth noting.  And worth stressing, that any such concept that does not include full participation and leadership from women as well is doomed to fail. So let’s think about that for a bit.

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Eric Britton
9, rue Gabillot, 69003 Lyon France

Bio: Educated as a development economist, Eric Britton is an American political scientist, teacher and international sustainability activist who has lived and worked in Paris since 1969. Professor of Sustainable Development, Economy and Democracy at the Institut Supérieur de Gestion (Paris), he is also MD of EcoPlan Association, an independent advisory network providing strategic counsel for government and business on policy and decision issues involving complex systems, social-technical change and sustainable development. Founding editor of World Streets: The Politics of Transport - https://worldstreets.wordpress.com . | Britton online: https://goo.gl/9CJXTh

View complete profile