Women in Transport – As seen from Uganda

One of World Streets most consistent, persistent policy objectives is our long-term and firmly held recommendation that not only should our transportation systems be (a) designed to offer as the highest priority full and fair service for women of all ages and stations of life, but also that (b) the decision process involved something approaching a full quorum of female leaders and participants. For more on that we invite you to click  here for World streets coverage of these issues since 2009, and for more on the Gender, Equity & Transport Forum 2.0  go here –   http://gatnet.wordpress.com.

The following article on the  status and role of women in transport in Uganda  has been sent to us by the Civil Society Coalition on Transport (CICOT) in Uganda.

uganda women street carrying on heads

 

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uganda - Transporter Newsletter - top page

WOMEN IN TRANSPORT

- Source: CISCOT - The Transporter Newsletter 2014, Issue .

The present transport system has largely been designed to carter more for men and majorly by men. Professionals are increasingly aware of the social dimension of transport, but there is still fundamental lack of awareness of the gen­der differentiated impact of transport policy and provision. There is a need to introduce piecemeal initiatives, such as the Public Transport Gender Audit and the subsequent Public Transport Gender Checklist right from the local level and closely monitor and audit their take up closely.

Apparently the employment in the transport sector is very male-dominated. This constrains women in development.

There is scarcity of women in central positions in the policymaking and planning of transport, and there is a systematic failure to incorporate the voices of women users in the consultation and planning of the transport systems. The absence of systematic gender inclusion procedures for transport, in terms of training for professionals, the participation of users or the design and planning of systems services and equipment suggests that gender analysis is not seen as relevant to transport policy. More women than men are facing transport problems in accessing a range of public services.

It is no longer acceptable not to have women sit with men in decision-making roles. This will benefit the institutions involved in create a more balanced work environment. Let us begin by lighting a single candle than to sit and curse the darkness.

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What is CISCOT?

The Civil Society Coalition on Transport in Uganda (CISCOT) aims to contribute to an efficient, effective and safe transport system. It brings together organisations to harness the potential of civil society and to build a strong, collective voice to address the needs and concerns of citizens on transport issues.  Created in 2013, the Coalition focuses on three broad areas:

  • Citizen mobilisation and support
  • Sector monitoring, advocacy and influence
  • Coalition building and institutional development

Contact:

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World Streets can only applaud and hope the very best for this courageous civil society initiative  in an environment which is not always so  welcoming of  contrary views.

Author/Editor
9, rue Gabillot, 69003 Lyon France

Bio: Trained as a development economist, Eric Britton is MD of EcoPlan International, an independent advisory network providing strategic counsel for government, business and civil society on policy and decision issues involving complex systems, social-technical change and sustainable development. His forthcoming book, “Toward a General Theory of Transport in Cities”, is being presented, discussed and critiqued in a series of international conferences, master classes, workshops and media events over 2014. (More at http://wp.me/PsKUY-2p7)

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Join: The Gender, Equity and Transport Forum

Want to have a quick look at a new collaborative website on our important subject that we are just starting to work up? And give us your first impressions and views? It is still very rough, but we think it’s perhaps not a bad start. With your help it will be better.

Thanks for taking the time to share your ideas.

- – – > Click to Gender, Equity and Transport Forum – at http://gatnet.wordpress.com/

- – – > Click to Facebook Group page – at https://www.facebook.com/groups/gatnet

 

africa - Zambia - women bicycle ambulence

Bicycle ambulances help women in need of urgent medical care in Africa

 

World Transport Policy & Practice – Vol. 19, No. 2

Rural access, health & disability in Africa

A Special Edition of World Transport, Spring 2013

africa bike hosptial transportTransport, health and disability are interlinked on many levels, with transport availability directly and indirectly influenc­ing health, and health status influencing transport options. This is especially the case in rural locations of sub-Saharan Af­rica, where transport services are typically not only high cost, but also less frequent and less reliable than in urban areas.

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Demand Nirbhaya—Fearless—Cities

- Anumita Roychowdhury, Dehli.  6 Mar, 2013

Catalysing safe design for public spaces should be among the top priorities to make cities safe for women, children and elderly

I first let this pass without comment—the Rs 1,000 crore Nirbhaya fund for women’s safety proposed in the Union Bdget.  Many have glossed over this with a reverent salute to quickly move on to the hard numbers of this stark accounting document. Others are angry, outraged, and dismissive of this fund as tokenism and populism with no clarity of mandate. But I read that paragraph in the budget speech once again.

My attention was riveted to this observation: “As more women enter public spaces—for education or work or access to services or leisure—there are more reports of violence against them.” The operative word here is “public spaces”.  Of course, Chidambaram has used this literally to state the obvious. But if we were to join the dots to write the terms of reference for the ministry of women and child development and other ministries to define the scope and structure of the ‘Nirbhaya fund’, then catalysing safe design for “public spaces” would be among the top priorities.

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La femme est l’avenir de l’homme

* Click to enlarge

The French poet Louis Aragon told us some two generations ago that “Woman is the future of man”.  And if we had any doubts about that as we enter into 2012, we  have today before our eyes this exceptional, moving photograph of a street demonstration yesterday in which several thousand brave women marched through central Cairo in an extraordinary expression of anger over images of soldiers beating, stripping and kicking female demonstrators in Tahrir Square. Continue reading

III. Women shaping the future of transport in cities: Who, how, where?

29 July progress report:
This off-the-cuff collaborative brainstorm is proving a pure and joyful learning experience. We started out with a single long-held idea: the importance of getting all aspects of the sustainable transport establishment on to a gender-level footing. Continue reading