European Mobility Week- Cycling Events Guidelines 2014

netherlands amsterdam cyclists - bottom halfThe following is intended to provide for our readers a useful overview of the cycling component of the EC’s European Mobility Week, with a view to being useful both for cycle planning and programs and eventually as background for the planned city cycle audit activity presently being discussed as a possible component of a certain number off cooperating cities’ 2014 Car Free Days.  This information has been extracted from their European Mobility Week Handbook which is available at http://goo.gl/ahWEyO

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Arthur D. Little on Carsharing 3.0

In a recent report issued by Author D Little under the title “The Future of Urban Mobility 2.0″, (freely ADLitle logoavailable at http://goo.gl/Jb6fX1), the authors provide two interesting graphics and thoughts about carsharing and where it might be going. What is interesting about their analysis is that they are looking at the sector from outside — that is, both as one part of the move  a broader New Mobility package,  and from a business perspective.  We have extracted here the two graphics illustrating their findings, along with their page of observations. At the end of the extracts we provide some contextual information and background references from our extensive carshare archives.

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Weekend fishing expedition: You have heard of about PISA course. But what about PISTA?

little-girl“If you can’ measure it, you can’t manage it” vs. “The important stuff can’t be measured”.

In this critical spirit let us see what happens if we put this idea of somehow addressing the performance of cities and countries when it comes to sustainable transport tin cities, in front of the collective intelligence of our readers and colleagues in order to see if something useful can be done with it. But first to get the ball rolling, some disorganized first thoughts about PISA and . . . PISTA.

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Tribune: What Integrated Sustainability Really Means

For more than 20 years, I’ve been among those promoting a more integrated approach to sustainability. It’s not just about the environment and resources, I keep reminding people. It’s about systems: understanding their interconnections, the viability of their long-term trends, their limits.

And sustainable development is about changing systems … for the better.

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Women in Transport – As seen from Uganda

One of World Streets most consistent, persistent policy objectives is our long-term and firmly held recommendation that not only should our transportation systems be (a) designed to offer as the highest priority full and fair service for women of all ages and stations of life, but also that (b) the decision process involved something approaching a full quorum of female leaders and participants. For more on that we invite you to click  here for World streets coverage of these issues since 2009, and for more on the Gender, Equity & Transport Forum 2.0  go here –   http://gatnet.wordpress.com.

The following article on the  status and role of women in transport in Uganda  has been sent to us by the Civil Society Coalition on Transport (CICOT) in Uganda.

uganda women street carrying on heads

 

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uganda - Transporter Newsletter - top page

WOMEN IN TRANSPORT

- Source: CISCOT - The Transporter Newsletter 2014, Issue .

The present transport system has largely been designed to carter more for men and majorly by men. Professionals are increasingly aware of the social dimension of transport, but there is still fundamental lack of awareness of the gen­der differentiated impact of transport policy and provision. There is a need to introduce piecemeal initiatives, such as the Public Transport Gender Audit and the subsequent Public Transport Gender Checklist right from the local level and closely monitor and audit their take up closely.

Apparently the employment in the transport sector is very male-dominated. This constrains women in development.

There is scarcity of women in central positions in the policymaking and planning of transport, and there is a systematic failure to incorporate the voices of women users in the consultation and planning of the transport systems. The absence of systematic gender inclusion procedures for transport, in terms of training for professionals, the participation of users or the design and planning of systems services and equipment suggests that gender analysis is not seen as relevant to transport policy. More women than men are facing transport problems in accessing a range of public services.

It is no longer acceptable not to have women sit with men in decision-making roles. This will benefit the institutions involved in create a more balanced work environment. Let us begin by lighting a single candle than to sit and curse the darkness.

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What is CISCOT?

The Civil Society Coalition on Transport in Uganda (CISCOT) aims to contribute to an efficient, effective and safe transport system. It brings together organisations to harness the potential of civil society and to build a strong, collective voice to address the needs and concerns of citizens on transport issues.  Created in 2013, the Coalition focuses on three broad areas:

  • Citizen mobilisation and support
  • Sector monitoring, advocacy and influence
  • Coalition building and institutional development

Contact:

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World Streets can only applaud and hope the very best for this courageous civil society initiative  in an environment which is not always so  welcoming of  contrary views.

Author/Editor
9, rue Gabillot, 69003 Lyon France

Bio: Trained as a development economist, Eric Britton is MD of EcoPlan International, an independent advisory network providing strategic counsel for government and business on policy and decision issues involving complex systems, social-technical change and sustainable development. His forthcoming book, “Toward a General Theory of Transport in Cities”, is being presented, discussed and critiqued in a series of international conferences, master classes, workshops and media events over 2014. (More at http://wp.me/PsKUY-2p7)

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Surprising Things You Never Knew About Transport

This is the first in a series of four short films prepared by a faculty team  from the Centre for Transport and Society at the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol).  The four podcasts pose some interesting questions and give an insightful appraisal of what influences travel habits, delivered by nationally leading experts in the field of transport research: Professor Glenn Lyons, Dr Steve Melia, Professor Graham Parkhurst and Professor John Parkin. Today’s film is presented by Steve Melia and looks into some surprising questions from Steve’s forthcoming book ‘Urban Transport Without the Hot Air’. All  four films can be viewed on the UWE Bristol web pages.

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Getting ready for Earth Car Free Days (in 2001)

From the Archives:

Back in March of 2001 a reporter from Grist Magazine took contact with Eric Britton of EcoPlan’s World Car Free Day program for an interview concerning progress in the run-up for the first Earth Car Free Day,  at the time being jointly organized by his team in partnership with the Earth Day Network for 19 April 2001.  The interview eventually morphed into a week-long series of articles on various aspects (real and imagined) of the Car Free Day push which you will find below. (For original articles click to Grist at http://grist.org/article/britton-earthcarfree/full/).

car early ladies policeman

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